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Open Research: Ideas and Examples

Ideas and Examples

The purpose of this section is to share ideas and examples of Open Research approaches used by DMU researchers and others.  This section will be added to, as we identify more ideas and examples.  Please contact us at openaccess@dmu.ac.uk if you have anything you would like us to consider including.

Ideas for Open Research

Pre-registrations and Registered Reports adhere to the principles of open science by encouraging transparent pre-specification of outcomes, methods and analyses, and (for Registered Reports) by stimulating peer discussion early in the lifecycle of scientific work. (See: Pre-registration and Registered Reports: a Primer from UKRN. DOI:10.31219/osf.io/8v2n7)

 

Social Media can be a tool for academic openness, not only for the dissemination of research to wider audiences, but also for networking, framing, investigating and assessing aspects of research. (See: McCarthy & Bogers, 2023, The Open Academic...  DOI: 10.1016/j.bushor.2022.05.001)

 

Open Peer Review involves opening up what has traditionally been a closed process.  This increases opportunities to spot errors, validate findings and to increase overall trust in published outputs. (See: What is Open Peer Review? - a 3 minute video by Foster Open Science)

 

Octopus is a new way of publishing.  It sits alongside journals and other outlets, allowing those to specialise in delivering key findings to their audiences whilst Octopus acts like a 'patent office' to record who has done what and when, and ensure the quality, integrity and accessibility of all primary research, in full. (Find out more in this 2 min video introduction, and try it out using this handy author guide)

Examples of Open Research at DMU

The Shaxican project, initiated by DMU researcher Prof. Gabriel Egan, aimed to test Prof. Donald Foster’s theory that it is possible to deduce the plays in which Shakespeare acted through analysis of the rare words in the plays he wrote.  This was based on the idea that an actor-playwright’s writing would be influenced by words used in the part they most recently acted.  Foster’s claims had not been substantiated because the underlying database he used was never shared...